build a web site | fundraising | community | collect fees online | blogz
Liberty H.S. boys soccer teams
Liberty H.S. boys soccer teams:Conditioning  
 
 
Home Home
My Site News My Site News
Events Events
Schedules Schedules
Standings Standings
Practices Practices
Locations Locations
Boosters Board Boosters Board
Team roster Team roster
Stats Stats
Albums Albums
Links Links
LHS Soccer Boosters LHS Soccer Boosters
Guestbook Guestbook
Message Boards Message Boards
Parent Page Parent Page
Coach Page Coach Page
Keeper Page Keeper Page
Player Page Player Page
Soccer Tips/Drills Soccer Tips/Drills
Conditioning Conditioning
College soccer College soccer
Soccer history Soccer history
Gear & Apparel Gear & Apparel
Support Our Team Support Our Team

Admin

Get Directions to Liberty LeopardsYoungstown Local Weather
Liberty Leopards
Michael G. Morelli
330-637-8947
Fax: 330-395-1514
1 Leopard Way.
Youngstown, Ohio
44585
 
  Conditioning  
 

Team News Extra
Soccer "warm-up" program information
A good soccer warm up meets three important objectives...
1. Decreases the risk of injury.

2. Increases agility, skill, power and performance.

3. Allows players to mentally prepare and focus on the game or session at hand.


A cold muscle is stiff and rigid. Sudden twisting, turning and stretching can place greater tension on muscles and connective tissue than they can handle...

Warming up and stretching the active muscles in soccer can decrease the risk of strains, sprains and muscle tears.

Muscles can also produce energy faster when they are warm. This can affect speed and power, not to mention the ability to perform complex skills and movements with accuracy and precision.

By also practising some short, sharp drills, an effective soccer warm up can get players into the right state of "readiness" right from the kick off. How often do teams and individual players take 15 minutes or so to get into the pace of a game?

Even if you are warming up for a training session, it's good idea to follow a set warm up routine.

Also bear in mind that a resting muscle is never warmed up no matter what the outside temperature! It takes physical activity to achieve the desired outcome.

So what does an effective soccer warm up consist of?



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Soccer Warm Up Activites
and Intensity
Include some light, general aerobic exercise - jogging, skipping, running backwards, side stepping etc. at the start. Avoid explosive movements at this stage and any sudden turning and twisting actions.
You can then move onto to some light stretches...

Focus on the groins, hamstrings, quads and calves. Try doing some dynamic stretches first - making circles with the arms and ankles, gently kicking the air as if to kick a ball, turning from side to side at waist and so on.

Progress to static stretching exercise holding each stretch for 10 seconds or so.

Prior to a match these light, general warm up activities should become more soccer specific...

Short sprints, some twisting and turning movements and jumping should start to feature. It's also a good idea to add a ball or two. The emphasis however, is still on the physical component (rather then touch and skill).

A ball is not necessary if you are simply warming up for a training session.

Some skill work and passing drills can follow as intensity drops for a few minutes. This is when players should as focus as much on mentally preparing as physically warming up.

A soccer warm up should finish with some demanding drills that mirror the intensity of a competitive game...

Keeping this section short (5 minutes at most) won't tire the players for the game but it will kick start their body's ability to buffer and remove lactic acid.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Duration of the
Soccer Warm Up
So many players (especially in the company of team mates) immediately start shooting at goal, jumping for crosses, and kicking the ball long across field as soon as they step on the pitch.
Shooting and kicking long requires a maximal force of contraction and a wide range of movement. In short...

Shooting repetitively at goal before warming up is a sure-fire way to pull or strain something. If you're a coach it's a good idea to keeps soccer balls hidden until the latter stages of the warm up.

Before a match a good 10-15 minutes is required at least. Although anything longer than 20 minutes can become too depleting on the body's energy reserves.

If the warm up is for a training session, 10 minutes is fine - maybe 15 minutes on particularly cold days.

Makes sure the end of the warm up is close to kick off...

Talking tactics for 20-30 minutes for example, will cause warm muscles to cool almost completely. Keep the break after a warm up to 5 minutes and then just prior to kick off, do some knees to chest, skipping or 5 yard sprints etc.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sample Soccer Warm Up Drills

Group Drill #1
This is a good drill to start a session off and makes a change from simply running widths of the pitch.
1. Have the team make a circle about 20 yards in diameter (roughly the size of the center circle).
2. They should be be arms width apart from the player to their left and right. Place a cone in the center of the circle.
3. Have the players jog in together to the cone then jog backwards to the outer edge of the circle.
4. Vary the runs to the center - high knees, heel flicks, sidestepping, lunge strides, hop on one leg etc. Keep the intensity light.

Group Drill #2
This drill can be used in the middle or towards the end of the soccer warm up.

1. With a group of 6-8 players split them into 2 smaller groups of 3-4 players.
2. Both groups stand in a line facing each other about 10 yards apart (see below).
3. The player at the front of group A passes the ball and follows his/her pass to run to the back of group B.
4. The player at the front of group B who receives the ball then passes to the next player in group A and follows his/her pass to run to the back of group A and so on.
5. Each player should focus on a good first touch, an accurate pass and then an immediate sprint to the back of the opposite group.
6. Gradually close the gap between groups until it is just 1 yard apart. Players literally will have one touch and they must quickly get into position for the next pass.
7. You can also lengthen the gap to 20-30 yards and have the players run with ball half way before passing and sprinting to the back of the opposite group.



Group Drill #3
This drill is useful towards the end of a soccer warm up.

1. Have the team make a circle about 20 yards in diameter (roughly the size of the center circle).
2. Four players get into 2 pairs and stand in the center of the circle.
3. One pair is nominated attackers the other pair are defenders.
4. The attacking pair start with the ball. They must keep possession between themselves while the defending pair try to intercept the ball.
5. The attackers can use the outside players (who should be alert and ready to receive) to pass to.
6. The objective is for the 4 players in the center to work hard - moving and closing down for 90 seconds. Change to another 4 players every 60-90 seconds.


With a group of more than 12 players, it is better to split them in to 2 smaller groups. In this case only 2 players go in the center and must work together to dispossess the players on the outer edge of the circle who have the ball.



It's fairly easy to design your own soccer warm up. Be creative. Change the drills to keep it fresh.
Warming up before a game is as much about mental preparation and team spirit as the physical aspect.



Shoe_line
Click on Shoe Line image to go to the "Top of Page"

Leopard running
Sunday, February 20
Conditioning speed training (FARTLEK)
Interval Training

by Christopher Williams
�Explanation of Training Notes� by David Graham

CONDITIONING

Conditioning is the most basic element of any athletic success. Without it, athletic success is the result luck. While luck is appreciated, it does unexpectedly go wherever it wants. Therefore, to achieve athletic success, luck must be removed and replaced with skill and execution. Only then will you be in control of the things you can control, at the time you need to control them.
Proper conditioning shall achieve three things. First, is the obvious plus in physical performance late in the game. Second, is that mental functions are quicker and more apt to be correct when not under physical duress. Third, is that most injuries occur as the players fatigue threshold approaches.
There should never be a reason for anyone to wonder, if conditioning was a factor. That would suggest a lack of suitable preparation, which should not be allowed! Everyone must participate! For if just one player, for one instant, at a critical time, is not able to keep up, then that team effort shall be lost for always.
The �Fartlek Running and Training Program� was developed by a strength and conditioning coach to address the physical requirements of �intervals�, which are found in most team athletics. The idea is that by using a training format which parallels the sport, the benefits of the training are realized more quickly. Quite surprisingly, research that is ongoing today, has shown that with little variation, the same training format works for almost all team sports.

FARTLEK RUNNING

The word �fartlek� comes from the Swedish words for �speed play�. Fartlek running and training consists of varying the distance and intensity of the work within the overall training distance that you run. This type of training will be performed in sets of three sessions, during a one week time frame.
General Training Guidelines

1.        Stretch properly BEFORE AND AFTER each training session. A light jog is required to warm the muscles before stretching.

2.        When speed runs are included early in the session, then some 1/2 speed runs must be performed first as part of the warmup, to prepare the muscles.

3.        Light jogging and stretching after heavy training sessions will rid your legs of waste products (lactic acid). A buildup of lactic acid shall cause a heavy and sluggish feeling in the legs. Light jogging and stretching will relieve that feeling.

4.        Always use a watch and time your runs. It is best to keep a training diary of your times etc.

5.        It is best to train with one or two other people.

6.        Always take in fluids in moderate levels before, during, and after a training session. Water is fine, or use a sport drink if you prefer (not a soft drink).

7.        Make sure that you are playing as well as doing the conditioning program. Work on your passing, first touch with the ball, and shooting. DO NOT ONLY RUN!!!!
1A-1


EXPLANATION OF TRAINING NOTES

1.        You should not begin interval training of any kind until your aerobic capacity has been established. If your fitness level is not high, you should plan to complete at least 2 weeks of regular aerobic capacity training before attempting fartlek or other interval training. A sample plan for 4 weeks of aerobic capacity training for U15 and above would be the following:

        Week 1: Choose a distance you can run comfortably in about 25 min. Run the same distance four times, attempting to reduce your time to between 20 and 22 min by the fourth run. (Don�t worry if your time does not improve every time you run � look for a trend toward improvement!)
        Week 2: Choose a distance you can run comfortably in about 30 min. Run the same distance four times, attempting to reduce your time to between 26 and 28 min by the fourth run.
        Week 3: Choose a distance you can run comfortably in about 35 min. Run the same distance four times, attempting to reduce your time to between 30 and 33 min by the fourth run.
        Week 4: Choose a distance you can run comfortably in about 40 min. Run the same distance four times, attempting to reduce your time to between 35 and 38 min by the fourth run.


2.        This training, which is quite short but intense, should be done regardless of whether you have a practice.

3.        Sit-ups should be done in sets; for example, if you see 100 sit-ups (5x20), this means you should do 5 sets of 20 sit-ups, with 20-30 seconds of rest between sets.

4.        Rough distance equivalents in terms of a full-size soccer pitch:
        15 m = about 1 stride less than the distance from the goal line to the top of the 18
        20 m = centre of the goal to the closer edge (not the top) of the penalty area
        50 m = goal line to halfway line
        100 m = 1 field length
        200 m = 2 field lengths
        800 m = 8 field lengths or about 2.5 circuits outside the lines
        1 km = about 3 circuits
        ï¿½Running the lake� = about 3.5 km or a bit less.

5.        ï¿½Shuttle cones� are a given number of cones or other markers set up a given distance apart. To run this exercise, start from the given distance before the first cone, run to the first cone and then back to the start, then to the second one and back to the start, and so on. So if you see �2 - 4 x 10 shuttle cones, 30 sec rest between�, that means to set up your cones or other markers like this, where �S� is the starting line:
        S          o          o          o          o
        |-- 10 m --|-- 10 m --|-- 10 m --|-- 10 m --|
        You would run the shuttles once, then rest for 30 sec, then run them again for a total of 2 sets. If you see �4 - 4 x 15 shuttle cones�, that means to run 4 repetitions with 4 cones set up 15 m apart, and the first one 15 m from the starting line.

6.        ï¿½Back sprints� are simply sprints performed running backwards.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TRAINING FOR U-16 & U-17
NB: All stretch and warm ups include a 2 minute jog period

FIRST WEEK

Session #1: 30 minutes total        
        
1. Stretch and warm up, 150 sit ups (6x25)        
2. Run 3 km, 15 min max, rest 4 min        
3. Stretch and rest 2 min        
4. 2 - 200 m sprints, 45 sec. between        
5. 3 - 4 X 10 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between        
6. 2 minute agility run        
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #2: 30 minutes total

1. Stretch and warm up, 100 sit ups (5x20)
2. 2 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 4 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 4 - 4 X10 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
5. 4 - 20 m back sprints, 10 sec. between
6. 2 - 25 m sprints, 20 sec between
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #3: 30 minutes total - Repeat session #1.



SECOND WEEK

Session #1: 30 minutes total        
        
1. Stretch and warm up, 150 sit ups (5x30)        
2. Run 3 km, 15 min max, rest 4 min        
3. Stretch and rest 3 min        
4. 1 - Sprint & jog 100 m, rest 30 sec.        
5. 2 - Sprint and walks        
6. 2 minute agility run        
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #2: 30 minutes total

1. Stretch and warm up, 150 sit ups (5x30)
2. 2 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 4 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints, 10 sec. between
5. 4 - 4 X 10 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
6. 4 - 10 m back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down


Session #3: 30 minutes total - Repeat session #2.

THIRD WEEK

Session #1: 30 minutes total        
        
1. Stretch and warm up, 200 sit ups (5x40)
2. Run 3 km, 16 min max, rest 4 min        
3. 2 - 4 X 10 shuttle cones, 15 sec. between        
4. 3 - Sprint and walks        
5. 3 - 20 m back sprints, 15 sec. between        
6. 1 - Sprint & jog 100 m        
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down
        
Session #2: 30 minutes total

1. Stretch and warm up, 200 sit ups (5x40)
2. 3 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 4 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints. 10 sec. between
5. 3 - 4 X 10 shuttle cones, 20 sec. between
6. 4 - 15 yd back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 2 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #3: 30 minutes total -- Repeat session #2.

FOURTH WEEK

Repeat training schedule from week three.

1A-4
_____________________________________________________________________

OPTIONAL PROGRAM FOR VARSITY




TRAINING FOR U-18 & U-19
NB: All stretch and warm ups include a 2 minute jog period
FIRST WEEK

Session #1: 30 minutes total        
        
1. Stretch and warm up, 100 sit ups (5x20)        
2. Run 3 km, 16 min max        
3. Stretch and rest for 4 min        
4. 2 - 200 m sprints, 45 sec. between.        
5. 2 - 4 x 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between        
6. 2 Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #2: 30 minutes total

1. Stretch and warm up, 100 sit ups (5x20)
2. 3 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 3 - 50 m sprints, 20 sec. between
4. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
5. 3 - 20 m sprints, 15 sec between
6. 6 - 10 m sprints, 30 sec. between
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #3: 30 minutes total - Repeat session #1

SECOND WEEK

Session #1: 30 minutes total        
        
1. Stretch and warm up, 120 sit ups (4x30)        
2. Run 3.5 km, 17 min max        
3. Stretch and rest 3 min        
4. 1 - 200 m light jog        
5. 2 - Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
6. 3 - Sprint and walk 100 m        
7. 2 minute jog, stretch and warm down
        
Session #2: 30 minutes total

1. Stretch and warm up, 150 sit ups (5x30)
2. 3 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 3 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints, 10 sec. between
5. 2 - 4 X 15 Shuttle cones, 15 sec. between
6. 4 - 15 m back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #3: 30 minutes total - Repeat session #2

THIRD WEEK

Session #1: 30 minutes total
                
1. Stretch and warm up, 200 sit ups (5x40)        
2. Run 4 km, 18 minute max        
3. Stretch and rest 4 minutes        
4. 3 Sprint and walk        
5. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between        
6. 2 Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
7. 3 minute jog, Stretch and warm down        

Session #2: 30 minutes total

1. Stretch and warm up, 200 sit ups (5x40)
2. 3 -100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 4 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints, 10 sec. between
5. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
6. 4 -15 m back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 2 minute jog, stretch and warm down


Session #3: 30 minutes total - Repeat session #2

FOURTH WEEK

Repeat training schedule from week three.

1A-5

Click Here to get a pdf file on the conditioning program we will be using for the first four weeks of player speed training and conditioning July 5 - Aug. 6th. The 16 - 17 year old program template listed, is the program that we will be using for the Varsity and JV teams.


Shoe_line
Click on Shoe line image to go back to "Home Page"

Leopard running
Sunday, February 25
Balance training
The press information below was taken from an ankle balance study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine by Tim McGuine PhD, ATC and Dr. Jim Keene.

By Megan Rauscher

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - High school athletes can markedly reduce their risk of ankle sprains, especially those with a history of ankle sprains, by spending five to ten minutes of practice time doing simple balance exercises, a study shows.

"It has been recognized for a number of years that balance training helps people post-injury, whether it is a knee injury or ankle injury," Dr. Timothy A. McGuine, Senior Athletic Trainer at the University of Wisconsin Health Sports Medicine Center in Madison told Reuters Health.

Balance training has also been shown to reduce the incidence of injuries in adult soccer players.

"Our goal was to see if could get similar results with high school athletes by designing a balance training program that was easily incorporated into practices," McGuine noted.

A total of 765 male and female high school soccer and basketball players were randomly assigned to an intervention group that participated in balance training or to a control group that performed only standard conditioning exercises.

Early in the season, McGuine explained, the intervention group did balance exercises five days per week. They started with basic balance training like standing on one leg with their eyes shut and standing on one leg while trying to dribble a basketball or kick a soccer ball. They then progressed to standing on a balance or "wobble board."

Once the regular soccer or basketball season started, athletes performed these simple balance exercises three times per week. The balance exercises took about 7 to 10 minutes out of practice time.

Sixty-two of the 765 athletes sustained an acute ankle sprain during their sports season.

According to McGuine and colleagues, the rate of ankle sprains was significantly lower in the balance trainers (6 percent versus 10 percent in the control group).

"The results of this study document that a simple, inexpensive, balance training program performed during a high school sport season will reduce the rate of ankle sprains by 38 percent in male and female high school soccer and basketball players," the investigators report in The American Journal of Sports Medicine.

Ankle sprains are very common in high school athletes and they have a "profound impact on healthcare costs and resources," McGuine and colleagues point out.

A decrease of 38 percent of ankle sprains in this population would reduce direct health care costs by $26 million and indirect health care costs by $380 million each year if the program were used on a national level for these two sports alone, the team calculates.

Consistent with other studies, the current study found that athletes who sustained an ankle sprain within the previous 12 months had more than double the risk of sustaining another sprain. The balance-training program reduced the risk of re-injury in these athletes by nearly half.

The balance-training program also appeared to reduce the incidence of ankle sprains in athletes without a history of ankle sprains, although the difference was not statistically significance. The rate of ankle sprains for athletes without a history of ankle sprains was 4.3 percent in the balance-training group and 7.7 percent in the control group.

McGuine also noted that "our initial data looks like we have more ACL tears, more knee problems in the kids who didn't do the balance exercises."

The balance-training program used in this study "is low tech -- it doesn't take a lot of time -- it doesn't cost a lot," and could be easily incorporated into most athletic team practices and physical education classes, McGuine said. "There is no down side to it."

SOURCE: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, July 2006.



Home | News & Events | Alumni | Program Info | The AT Experience | My ATEP | AT Student Association | AT Student Projects | AT Resources | Giving to ATEP
This file was modified on 8/16/2006 10:28:26 AM
Comments or Problems: webmanager@education.wisc.edu.
Site designed/maintained by External Relations Office

© Copyright 2006 The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System



Stick man ball shuttle
Friday, March 16
Hug your soccer ball after every practice
Practice Tip - Have You Hugged Your Ball Today

       Here are just a few stretching and strengthening exercises that players over age 12 can do with a ball. It is important for players to strengthen the front and sides of their legs (shins and thigh) and stretch the backs of the legs (Achilles, hamstrings and thighs) and the back. Some of these exercises need to be done in pairs. Shin splits and thigh pulls are more often than not due to a lack of strengthening. Running works the backs of the legs, causing an over-balance of
strength. A muscle that is strengthen needs to be stretched to maintain flexibility and suppleness. Many of the strengthening exercises that are isometric in nature should be held for only a 5-10 second count, depending upon the physical maturity and condition of the player.


Achilles and calves - place heel of foot on ground and sole of foot on ball; lean forward; a partner on the other side will stabilize the ball
Hamstrings - put the Achilles of one foot on the ball and bring chest forward
Hamstrings and buttocks - while standing with legs straight as possible, circle the ball around the feet with the hands; spread the legs and circle the ball around each foot
Back and Hamstrings - with legs straight and spread, reach ball back between the legs as far as possible; bring ball forward, arching back and neck looking upward, with only toes and ball touching the ground
Shin and Thigh - point toe down and press top of foot against the ball; ball must be stabilized against a wall or another player; player should feel the pressure in the thigh and shin
Groin - same as above except use inside of the foot; player should feel the pressure in the inner thigh and groin
Outside Thigh and Shin - same as above except point the toes inward and use the outside of the foot
Thigh - with ball positioned between the backs of two players, lower into a squat position, hold and return
Abdominals - hold ball between feet and in the air; do crunches; or reach up and touch ball on each sit-up
Hip Flexors, Back, and Abdominals - resting on forearms, ball between feet and off the ground with legs as straight as possible, move the ball in a figure eight; with a partner, each player circles the ball around the other player's ball
Abdominals - resting on forearms, ball between feet and off the ground, bring knees to the chest, then extend the legs; with a partner, extend the legs to one side, alternating sides with the partner
Lateral Abdominals - lying on back with ball between feet and legs straight up in air, lower the ball to one side maintaining the "L" shape; raise up and lower to the other side
Arms - pushups with one hand on the ball; either do a set with each hand or alternate the ball hand on each pushup
Arms - do pushups with the top of the feet on top of the ball
Neck - with partner holding ball, press forehead against ball
for 5-10 seconds; move to sides and back of head



Shoe_line

Sunday, May 27
June 2008 speed/conditioning practices

Conditioning program for 2008 LIBERTY VARSITY & JV teams



NB: All stretch and warm ups include a 2 minute jog/warm-up period min.
FIRST WEEK June 4th - 6th

Session #1:        
        
0. Stretch and warm up,
1. 100 sit ups (5x20) plus 120 jumps (4 types x 30) in a circle dribble format.
2. Run 3 km, 12 min max        (Three laps around stadium and field)
3. Stretch and rest for 4 min        
4. 2 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between.        
5. 2 - 4 x 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between        
6. 2 Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down

Session #2:

0. Stretch and warm up
1. 100 sit ups (5x20) plus 40 push ups (2x20) and 5 forward & 1 backward tire runs.
2. 3 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 3 - 50 m sprints, 20 sec. between
4. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
5. 3 - 20 m sprints, 15 sec between
6. 6 - 10 m sprints, 30 sec. between (Different starts each time)
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down


SECOND WEEK June 11th - 13th

Session #1:         
        
0. Stretch and warm up
1. 125 sit ups (5x25) plus 160 jumps ( 4 types x 40) in a circle dribble format.        
2. Run , 20 min max (Five laps around stadium and field)        
3. Stretch and rest 3 min        
4. 1 - 200 m light jog        
5. 2 - Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
6. 3 - Sprint and walk 100 m        
7. 3 minute jog, stretch and warm down
        
Session #2:

0. Stretch and warm up
1. 150 sit ups (5x30) plus 60 push ups (2x30) and 5 forward & 2 backward tire runs.        
2. 3 - 100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 3 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints, 10 sec. between (Different starts each time)
5. 2 - 4 X 15 Shuttle cones, 15 sec. between
6. 4 - 15 m back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 2 minute jog, stretch and warm down


THIRD WEEK June 18th - 20th

Session #1:
                
0. Stretch and warm up
1. 200 sit ups (5x40) plus 200 jumps (4types x 50) in a circle dribble format        
2. Run 19 minute max (Five laps around stadium and field)        
3. Stretch and rest 4 minutes        
4. 3 Sprint and walk 100m        
5. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between        
6. 2 Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
7. 3 minute jog, Stretch and warm down        

Session #2:

0. Stretch and warm up
1. 200 sit ups (5x40) plus 80 push ups (2x40) and 5 forward & 3 backward tire runs.
2. 3 -100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 4 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints, 10 sec. between (Different starts each time)
5. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
6. 4 -15 m back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 2 minute jog, stretch and warm down



FOURTH WEEK June 25th - 27th

Session #1:
                
0. Stretch and warm up
1. 200 sit ups (5x40) plus 200 jumps (5types x 40) in a circle dribble format        
2. Run 19 minute max (Five laps around stadium and field plus 2 around soccer)        
3. Stretch and rest 4 minutes        
4. 3 Sprint and walk        
5. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between        
6. 2 Sprint & jog 100 m, 30 sec. between        
7. 3 minute jog, Stretch and warm down        

Session #2:

0. Stretch and warm up
1. 200 sit ups (5x40) plus 80 push ups (4x25) and 5 forward & 4 backward tire runs.
2. 3 -100 m sprints, 45 sec. between
3. 4 - 50 m sprints, 30 sec. between
4. 6 - 10 m sprints, 10 sec. between (Different starts each time)
5. 4 - 4 X 15 shuttle cones, 30 sec. between
6. 4 -15 m back sprints, 15 sec. between
7. 2 minute jog, stretch and warm down




New sign (flashing)
New changes to the test.
Monday, March 5
SOCCER STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING EVALUATION (instructions)
Leopard running
SOCCER STRENGTH & CONDITIONING

EVALUATION FIELD TEST



1. BALANCE/STABILITY

A. SINGLE LEG STANCE - Stand on 1 foot and hold the other foot off of the ground by flexing the hip and knee. Record how many seconds balance is kept until a maximum of 30 seconds. Perform on each leg. First time no ball,second time with ball above the head and third time with the ball held out in front.


2. ANAEROBIC POWER

A. VERTICAL JUMP - Stand with one side next to the wall and reach up with the arm closest to the wall and touch the highest point. Placing some chalk on your fingertips should provide a good mark. Record this measurement from the ground to fingertip level. Now, keeping the fingertips chalked, flex hips and knees then jump straight up touching the wall at the highest point of the jump (do not step forward into the jump). Record the difference in inches between the stand & reach mark, and the jump mark. Perform a few warm-up jumps before making the 3 recorded efforts. Perform 3 attempts and use the best result as your final vertical jump height.

B. 20 SECOND CONE HOP - Place 3 cones about 1 yard apart. Stand laterally next to the outside of a cone on the end with 1 shoulder pointing towards the line of cones. Laterally jump with both feet over each cone in one direction, then once reaching the other end, reverse direction. Continue for 20 seconds (have another person time you and count the number of foot contacts). Record the total number of foot contacts. Perform a few warm-up jumps in both directions before making the recorded effort.

C. OVERHEAD MEDICINE BALL THROW - Perform 3 overhead throws (soccer throw-in) with a medicine ball (females-6-8 lbs. ball, males-10-12 lbs. ball, youths-6 lbs. ball). Use the best result of the 3 attempted throws. Perform a few light warm-up throws before making the 3 recorded efforts.


3. MUSCULAR STRENGTH

A. TRIPLE BROAD JUMP - Player stands with feet together and with his toes both on the start line. Player then broad jumps out from the line three hops to an upright stance. He then has the distance from the starting line to the back of his heels recorded. This jump is to be performed three times with a min of two other player's jump attempts performed and intersperse between each of his attempts. This will provides a minimum 2 to 1 rest to work ratio between each player's jump attempt. Each jump distance and then the average is recorded.


4. MUSCLE BALANCE

A. TIRE DRAG RUN/PULL - Player straps into the harness. Tire is positioned behind and touching the start line. At a verbal (Ready, Set, Go) command the player(s) run/pull the tire forward 40 yards and over the finish line. Time is recorded when the tire passes completely over the finish line. A minimum of two minutes is provided between the forward and backward attempts for the player to recover. The player then performs the same test backward. Each time is recorded with the deviation between each also calculated.


5. MUSCULAR ENDURANCE

A. ABDOMINAL CRUNCH(Total # in 1 minute) - Lie on your back with knees bent at a 90 degrees angle and feet placed flat on the floor. Place arms on the floor along the length of the body. Place a small strip of tape 5 inches from the fingertips of each hand. Perform an abdominal crunch far enough so that each hand reaches the tape. Return completely to start position with head back on the ground. Perform as many repetitions as possible in 1 minute. Have another person serve as a timer and count the number of repetitions completed in 1 minute.


6. FLEXIBILITY

A. SIT & REACH(Low Back/Hamstring) - Sit on the ground with legs extended out in front of your body. Place a yardstick on the ground (taped down) between your legs. The 15 inch mark should be level with the heels of your feet. Put some chalk on the fingertips. Extend both arms out in front of you placing one hand on top of the other with fingers extended. Reach forward as far as possible, while keeping the legs straight. At the furthest point of your reach, touch down and mark the yardstick with your chalked fingertips. Perform a few easy warm-up trials before attempting your real test. Perform 3 trials for recording. For males, reaching the 15 inch mark is average, 17-18 inch mark is above average, and 20 inches or greater is very good. If a male can only reach 12-13 inches, this is below average and one should definitely work on hamstring flexibility. For females, reaching the 18 inch mark is average, 20 inch mark is above average, and 22 inches or greater is very good. If a female can only reach 15 inches, this is below average and one should definitely work on hamstring flexibility.


7. AGILITY

A. 5-10-5 TEST - Set up 3 lines, 5 yards apart each. Start with feet straddled on the middle line. Have another individual time your run using a stopwatch. The timer should start the stopwatch after the command of Ready, Set, Go, on the first movement by any body part of the athlete. The first movement is to the right line(5 yards), then run back to the far left line(10 yards). Now, run back to the middle line(5 yards). Stop the time when the runner crosses this line. Perform 2 practice runs at moderate speed. Perform this test 2 times and record the average of the 2 results. Record time to the nearest tenth of a second.

B. T-DRILL TEST - Place 4 cones in a T-formation, 10 yards apart from the bottom of the T to the top of the T. The top of the T should have 3 cones placed 5 yards apart. Have another individual time your run using a stopwatch. The timer should start the stopwatch after the command of Ready, Set, Go, on the first movement by any body part of the athlete. The athlete should start behind the first cone at the bottom of the T. Run forward for 10 yards and touch the base of cone with the right hand. Shuffle step to the left for 5 yards, and touch base of cone with the left hand. Shuffle step to the right for 10 yards, and touch base of cone with the right hand. Shuffle step to the left for 5 yards to the middle cone, and touch base of cone with the left hand. Backpedal for 10 yards to the original starting cone. Stop the time when the athlete crosses this cone. Perform 2 practice runs at a moderate speed. Perform this test 2 times and record the average of the 2 results. Record time to the nearest tenth of a second.


8. SPEED

A. 10-YARD SPRINT - Place 2 lines, 10 yards apart. Start with both feet behind the first line. Have another individual time your run using a stopwatch. The timer should start the stopwatch after the command of Ready, Set, Go, on the first movement by any body part of the athlete. The athlete should run from the starting line through the finish line. Stop the time when the athlete crosses the 10-yard line. Perform 2 practice runs at moderate speed. Perform this test 2 times and record the average of the 2 results. Record time to the nearest hundredth of a second.

B. FLYING 10-YARD SPRINT - Place 2 lines, 20 yards apart and a third line, 10 yards apart from the second line. Have another individual time your run using a stopwatch. Run from the first line, past the second line, and continue running hard past the third line. The timer should start the stopwatch as the athlete passes the second line, and stop the time as the athlete passes the third line. Perform 2 practice runs at moderate speed. Perform this test 2 times, and record the average of the 2 results. Record time to the nearest hundredth of a second.

C. 40-YARD SPRINT - Place 2 lines, 40 yards apart. Start with both feet behind the first line in a 3-point stance(1 hand placed on the ground). Have another individual time your run using a stopwatch. The timer should start the stopwatch after the command of Ready, Set, Go, on the first movement by the athlete's hand on the ground. The athlete should run from the starting line through the finish line. Stop the time when the athlete crosses the 40-yard line. Perform 2 practice runs at moderate speed. Perform this test 2 times and record the average of the 2 results. Record time to the nearest tenth of a second.


9. ANAEROBIC RUN

A. 300-YARD SHUTTLE RUN - Place 2 lines, 25 yards apart. Start with both feet behind the first line. Have another individual time your run using a stopwatch. The timer should start the stopwatch after the command of Ready, Set, Go, on the first movement by any body part of the athlete. The athlete should run to the other line, touch it with the foot, and run back to the starting line. This run should be continued for 6 round trips(12 x 25 yards=300 yards). The timer should inform the athlete when he or she is about to start the 6th round trip run and encourage the athlete to finish strong. The timer stops the watch, when the athlete crosses the line after completing 6 round trips(300 yards). The athlete is to take a 5 minute rest period, then perform this test one more time. Record time to the nearest tenth of a second for each test run. Record the average of the 2 results.



Shoe_line

   
Liberty H.S. boys soccer teams
Liberty H.S. boys soccer teams
View Our Guestbook | Sign Our Guestbook
1 visitors have signed our guestbook.

 
 
 
  Web Sites Instruction Community
  Local Sites
Spotlight Sites
Build a Web Site
Tips and Drills
Sport Tip Email
Customer Support
News & Updates
Bulletin Boards
Camps & Clinics
Tournaments
Coaches' Corner


   
"As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what they do." - Andrew Carnegie
   
Copyright © 2014, eteamz.com, Inc
User Agreement