CSBOA: RAY'S CORNER

07 Jun 10 - NO OFFICIAL IS PERFECT

It's official: No official's perfect

Sometimes it's best for umpires and referees to admit it

Jerry Tipton / Herald-Leader Staff Writer KEVORK DJANSEZIAN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

At the inaugural John R. Wooden Classic in 1994, the former UCLA coach spoke to the crowd during a tribute to him at halftime of the UCLA-Kentucky game, which the Bruins won by one.The way baseball umpire Jim Joyce and the Detroit Tigers reacted to the blown call that prevented a perfect game last week surely reminded basketball referees of the wisdom of admitting mistakes."Yes, absolutely," said John Clougherty, who called Southeastern Conference games for decades and now is supervisor of officials for the Atlantic Coast Conference. "Oh, absolutely because if you don't, you lose all credibility."As Clougherty put it, "There are no perfect referees."John Adams, who supervises officials nationwide, agreed."Human beings making decisions in a split second, it's not a perfect science," Adams said. "Every referee in the course of a game might have one or two plays he knows he got wrong right after he calls it. If that becomes confrontational, one way to defuse it is to say, 'You know, Coach, you're right. I missed it.' "As Joyce's mistake on what should have been the last out of a perfect game showed, such admissions can ease tensions.Clougherty recalled a bad call he made at a crucial time that went against Thad Matta's Xavier team. A Xavier player contests a driving layup."He didn't touch him," Clougherty said of the Xavier player. "I anticipated the play and blew my whistle and called the foul."(The Xavier coaches) looked at me like, 'John, you've got to be better than that.' "After the game, Clougherty admitted the mistake to Matta. "He said, 'OK, I understand,' " Clougherty said. "He wasn't going to give me a hug and say, 'Don't worry. I know you're a good ref.' "The controversy with the Joyce call took Clougherty back to the 1989 NCAA Tournament championship game. Three seconds to go in overtime, he called a foul on Seton Hall. Michigan's Rumeal Robinson made both free throws to win the game."I was going to get crucified because my foul call basically determined the national championship game," he said.Seton Hall Coach P.J. Carlesimo did not publicly blame the loss on the one call.As Clougherty and Adams saw it, referees or umpires that do not admit mistakes are their own worst enemies."Ones that are stubborn or have too big a ego to admit mistakes, they lose their credibility, not only with coaches, but with the media and your supervisor," Clougherty said.When it comes to these confessions, there can be too much of a good thing."If you do that too often, then they question, 'Am I going to listen to this every night? Sorry, I missed the call. Sorry, I missed the call,'" Clougherty said. "The coach will say, 'Well, I'm sorry because I might get fired, too.' "Adams advised not admitting more than one mistake per game."You don't want to go over there five times in the same game and say, 'I missed another one, I missed another one,'" he said. "It probably decreases the level of acceptance each time."

 



07 Jun 10 - A PLAN TO GET GAME FILM.

07 Jun 10 - TIPS ON BREAKING DOWN TAPE.

30 May 10 - TOP TEN LAWS OF ROTATION

16 Apr 10 - HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF CAMP

28 Mar 10 - THE MATCH GAME

01 Feb 10 - REVIEWING BLOCK/CHARGE

25 Jan 10 - WHY DO WE ROTATE?

01 Jan 10 - Anticipation

04 Jan 10 - RECOGNIZING WHAT LOOK YOU HAVE

16 Dec 09 - PHILOSOPHY AND DEFAULT SETTINGS

09 Dec 09 - WORKING THE CENTER POSITION

07 Dec 09 - Continuous Motion

02 Dec 09 - Team Control

01 Dec 09 - Legal Guarding Position