BROOKLYN PITBULLS: Sickle Cell Awareness

Friday, January 25
Sickle Cell Disease Association of America, Inc.

About Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

What is Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)?

Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells that contain mostly hemoglobin* S, an abnormal type of hemoglobin. Sometimes these red blood cells become sickle-shaped (crescent shaped) and have difficulty passing through small blood vessels.

When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, less blood can each that part of the body. Tissue that does not receive a normal blood flow eventually becomes damaged. This is what causes the complications of sickle cell disease. There is currently no universal cure for sickle cell disease.

Hemoglobin is the main substance of the red blood cell. It helps red blood cells carry oxygen from the air in our lungs to all parts of the body. Normal red blood cells contain hemoglobin A. Hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C are abnormal types of hemoglobin. Normal red blood cells are soft and round and can squeeze through tiny blood tubes (vessels). Normally, red blood cells live for about 120 days before new ones replace them.

People with sickle cell conditions make a different form of hemoglobin A called hemoglobin S (S stands for sickle). Red blood cells containing mostly hemoglobin S do not live as long as normal red blood cells (normally about 16 days). They also become stiff, distorted in shape and have difficulty passing through the body's small blood vessels. When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, less blood can reach that part of the body. Tissue that does not receive a normal blood flow eventually becomes damaged. This is what causes the complications of sickle cell disease.

Types of Sickle Cell Disease

There are several types of sickle cell disease. The most common are: Sickle Cell Anemia (SS), Sickle-Hemoglobin C Disease (SC)

Sickle Beta-Plus Thalassemia and Sickle Beta-Zero Thalassemia.

What is Sickle Cell Trait?

Sickle Cell trait (AS) is an inherited condition in which both hemoglobin A and S are produced in the red blood cells, always more A than S. Sickle cell trait is not a type of sickle cell disease. People with sickle cell trait are generally healthy.



Sickle Cell Trait Masks Itself in Symptoms

A player hunched over, gasping for air between wind sprints could be something more serious than fatigue.

The exhaustion could be caused by sickle cell trait, which doesn’t indicate symptoms or health problems unless the body is under extreme physical stress, such as what can occur during conditioning.

At the youth level, coaches, parents and players need to be aware of the trait and its implications. A blood test to determine if a player has sickle cell trait, along with knowing the signs and symptoms of the trait allows for safer practices for players who have it.



Sickle Cell Trait Deaths in College Football Since 2000

Sickle-Cell Trait Awareness

Does your child have the "Sickle Cell Trait"?  You should have him/her tested, so that they know how to workout safely.

Sickle Cell trait deaths in college football since 2000.   



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