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Baseball  
BATTER INTERFERENCE WITH THE CATCHER

1. Declared interference on a play at first, second, or third: The batter is always out; runners return to the bases occupied at the time of the pitch.

Note: If the catcher’s throw retires the runner, the umpire ignores the "interference."

Note: Current interpretations from Evans:

a. "A batter shall not be charged with interference for standing still and consequently complicating the catcher's play at any base. if he is within the confines of the batter's box, he must make some 'other movement' that is deemed a hindrance to the catcher's play before interference is ruled."

b. "The action by the batter which causes interference does not have to be intentional. The batter is obligated to avoid making any movement which obstructs, impedes, or hinders the catcher’s play in any way. A swing which carries the batter over home plate and subsequently complicates the catcher’s play or attempted play should be ruled interference. Contact between the batter and catcher does not necessarily have to occur for interference to be ruled. Merely blocking the catcher’s vision to second base may very possibly be interference."

c. "If the catcher’s first throw following the interference retires a runner, the interference is disregarded. If a rundown ensues, the ball shall be declared dead at that time and the interference penalty enforced. If the runner reaches the base to which he is advancing safely, time should be called and the interference penalty enforced. Even though the runner may be put out trying to advance beyond his acquired base, this out does not stand since the catcher’s first throw did not retire the runner."

2. Declared interference on a play at the plate: With two out, the batter is out; with fewer than two out, the runner is out, the batter remains at bat, and other runners return to bases occupied at the time of the pitch.

3. Declared interference following a batted ball but before touching first base, double play situation: The batter is out and so is the runner on whom the defense would have played. If the umpire is uncertain, he is to call out the runner who has advanced nearest home base. (The batter’s interference need not be with the catcher; if the batter interferes with the pitcher or the first baseman, or any other fielder, impose the penalty.)

Note: In the OBR and NCAA, in the above situation the batter is out and so is the runner who has advanced closest to home.

Note: The interpretation in the OBR revolves around the principle known as "intervening play." See the discussion in the OBR section.

4. Interference after striking out: If the umpire judges the catcher could have retired a runner without the interference, the runner on whom the catcher played (or would have played) is out; other runners return to the bases occupied at the time of the pitch.

Note: In the OBR and NCAA, in the above situation the runner is out automatically.


FED BATTING RULES
Batter leaves the box between pitches
Batting out of order
Batter interference with the catcher
Designated Hitter
Hit by pitch
Illegal bat
Hits while out of box

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