South Kingstown Little League: Girls Softball

Thursday, January 3
Softball Divisions

We will have more information on player evaluations (mid to late March) and team placements soon. 

T-ball:

Ages 4-5, both boys and girls.

Instructional Softball:

Ages 5, 6 and 7. Meets once a week for 1 ½ hours. During each session players are introduced to the fundamentals of softball (throwing, hitting, fielding) through drills, then participate in a "game". The coaches pitch in this league.

Minor Softball:

Ages 7-10. Provides advanced instruction on softball fundamentals, and players are introduced to real game play. Team practice begins in April, followed by a full schedule of games. There are modified game rules (no stealing, etc.) so the focus is on learning and having fun. The players pitch along with the coaches.

Major Softball:

Ages 9-12. Builds on fundamentals while teaching other aspects of the game (stealing, sliding, etc.). Team practice begins in April, followed by a full schedule of games. Little League Softball rules apply. Players only pitch. Players from this division are chosen to represent South Kingstown on District All-Star teams.

Senior Softball:

Ages 13 to 16. This division is for girls looking to continue to play softball in a competitive league. Team practices begin in April, followed by a full schedule of games. Little League Softball rules apply. Players from this division are chosen to represent South Kingstown on District All-Star teams.




Tuesday, April 5
Fast Pitch Softball Equipment
SBPitching1

Gloves
If you are going to buy a new glove, please think about the players age and and the ball size. Majors and seniors use a 12" ball. Minors use an 11" ball.

Ages 7 to 10 should buy a glove that is an 10.5 to 12 inch*. Ages 10 to 13 should buy a glove that is 12 to 13.5 inches*. Remember that baseball gloves have a smaller pocket than softball gloves.

Bats
If you are going to buy a bat, again please think about the players age and size. The correct length* of a bat is found by having your athlete stand upright with her arms hanging straight down by her side. Rest a bat along side her arm, with the head of the bat on the ground. A good length bat should find the knob of the bat reaching between the middle of the palm of the hand and the wrist. If the bat reaches above the wrist, it is too long. If the bat reaches below the middle of the palm, it is too short.

The weight of the bat is determined by the length. Today's bats are mostly 11 ounce, 10 ounce and 9 ounce drops. For example, a bat that is a 10 ounce drop would have a length of 32 inches, and 22 ounces. An 11 ounce drop would be a 32 inch, and 21 ounce bat. The correct weight* of a bat is found by having your athlete stand upright, extend the left arm horizontally and hold the bat with the left hand (if she is right handed). If the bat or arm dips or sags, then the bat is too heavy for her.

It is better to buy a bat that is lighter than one that is heavier. A lighter bat will allow the player to generate more bat speed and hit the ball farther. Most High School players use bats that weigh 21 or 22 ounces.

*These are only guidelines, every player is different. Just remember to choose a bat or glove that fits properly. A bat or glove that is too big or too small will hinder the child's development.




Sunday, January 22
Countdown


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