Petaluma American Little League: Bat Information

Tuesday, January 7
2013/2014 Licensed Bats list

The 2013/2014 Licensed Bats list is now available, click HERE!



Friday, March 1
Bat Information

Click THIS LINK for a list of Composite Barrel bats that have received a waiver from Little League for use in the MAJOR DIVISION and below.

Major Division

There are no changes to the 2012 rules in the Major Division and below.  All rules and requirements from 2011 still apply.

Junior Division Changes

For Junior League Baseball: The rule was updated to reflect the changes that were anticipated and published two years ago regarding bats with 2 5/8 inch barrels. As a result, composite-barreled baseball bats in this division, regardless of barrel size, must meet BBCOR (Batted Ball Co-Efficient of Restitution) standards, and must be so labeled. Note that all composite-barreled baseball bats that meet the BBCOR standard have a “drop” of no more than “minus-3.” However, in the Junior League Baseball division, bats that do not have composite materials in the barrel (i.e., all metal, all alloy, all wood), and meet all other applicable standards, can have ANY drop weight. Bats with a barrel of less than 2 5/8 inches also can be used in the Junior League Baseball Division, but must still comply with all other specifications noted.

Senior Division Changes

For Senior League Baseball and Big League Baseball: The rule was updated to reflect the changes that were anticipated and published two years ago regarding bats with 2 5/8 inch barrels. As a result, all bats with non-wood barrels must meet BBCOR (Batted Ball Co-Efficient of Restitution) standards, and must be so labeled. Because all BBCOR bats have a “drop” of no more than “minus-3,” this means all non-wood bats in these divisions must have a drop of no more than minus-3.

New Penalties For Us Of Illegal Bats

Penalty for Use of an Illegal Bat: Previously, the penalty for the use of an illegal bat was simply to remove the bat from the game. In 2012, the penalty has been increased as noted in the rules below.

Little League's Definition Of An Illegal Bat

Definition of an Illegal Bat: To narrow the definition of an illegal bat, a new entry was added to Rule 2.00, specifically describing an illegal bat for the purposes of imposing the penalty. As a result, the definition includes altered bats, but excludes a bat that: is no longer smooth because of normal use; is cracked or dented because of normal use; has a handle that has a smaller diameter than the measurement noted in the specifications; or, has material on the grip (or no material) that does not meet the specifications.

From The Rule Book - Regarding Bats

The rules regarding baseball bats for 2012 are:

Rule 1.10 - Baseball - The bat must be a baseball bat which meets Little League specifications and standards as noted in this rule. It shall be a smooth, rounded stick and made of wood or of material and color tested and proved acceptable to Little League standards.

Little League (Majors) and below: it shall not be more than thirty-three (33) inches in length nor more than two and one-quarter (2¼) inches in diameter. Non-wood bats shall be labeled with a BPF (bat performance factor) of 1.15 or less; EXCEPTION: For the 2011-2012 Little League (Majors) and below, for regular season play and Tournament, composite bats are prohibited unless approved by Little League International.

A list of approved and licensed composite bats can be found on the Little League website atwww.littleleague.org.

Junior League: it shall not be more than 34 inches in length; nor more than 2 5/8 inches in diameter, and if wood, not less than fifteen-sixteenths (15/16) inches in diameter (7/8 inch for bats less than 30”) at its smallest part. All composite bats shall meet the Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) performance standard, and such bats shall be so labeled with a silkscreen or other permanent certification mark. The certification mark shall be rectangular, a minimum of a half-inch on each side and located on the barrel of the bat in any contrasting color.

Senior/Big League: it shall not be more than 36 inches in length, nor more than 2 5/8 inches in diameter, and if wood, not less than fifteen-sixteenths (15/16) inches in diameter (7/8 inch for bats less than 30”) at its smallest part. The bat shall not weigh, numerically, more than three ounces less than the length of the bat (e.g., a 33-inch-long bat cannot weigh less than 30 ounces). All bats not made of a single piece of wood shall meet the Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) performance standard, and such bats shall be so labeled with a silkscreen or other permanent certification mark. The certification mark shall be rectangular, a minimum of a half-inch on each side and located on the barrel of the bat in any contrasting color. Aluminum and composite bats shall be marked as to their material makeup being aluminum or composite. This marking shall be silkscreen or other permanent certification mark, a minimum of one-half-inch on each side and located on the barrel of the bat in any contrasting color.

In all divisions, wood bats may be taped or fitted with a sleeve for a distance not exceeding sixteen (16) inches (18 inches for Junior/Senior/Big League baseball) from the small end. A non-wood bat must have a grip of cork, tape or composition material, and must extend a minimum of 10 inches from the small end. Slippery tape or similar material is prohibited.

NOTE 1: Junior/Senior/Big League: The 2 3/4 inch in diameter bat is not allowed in any division.

NOTE 2: The traditional batting donut is not permissible

NOTE 3: The bat may carry the mark “Little League Tee Ball.”

NOTE 4: Non-wood bats may develop dents from time to time. Bats that cannot pass through the approved Little League bat ring for the appropriate division must be removed from play. The 2¼ inch bat ring must be used for bats in the Tee Ball, Minor League and Little League Baseball divisions. The 2 5/8 inch bat ring must be used for bats in the Junior, Senior and Big League divisions of baseball.

NOTE 5: An illegal bat must be removed. Any bat that has been altered shall be removed from play. Penalty – See Rule – 6.06 (d).

Rule 2.00 Definition of Illegal Bat
Illegal Bat – An Illegal bat is a bat that has been altered or a bat that is not approved for play because it does not meet specifications with regard to length, weight, barrel diameter, labeling or performance standard for the division in which it is used.

Rule 6.06 – Baseball - The batter is out for illegal action when –
(d) The batter enters the batter’s box with an illegal bat (see bat specifications Rule 1.10) or is discovered having used an illegal bat.
Note: If the infraction is discovered before the next pitch following the turn at bat of the player who used an illegal bat -

  1. The manager of the defense may advise the plate umpire of a decision to decline the penalty and accept the play. Such election shall be made immediately at the end of the play.
  2. For the first violation, the offensive team will lose one eligible adult base coach for the duration of the game.
  3. For the second violation, the manager of the team will be ejected from the game. Any subsequent violation will result in the newly designated manager being ejected.

Read below for more information than you probably ever wanted to know about bats .... 

Different types of bats (excluding wood):

Alloy - These are the bats that we are most familiar with.  Although they looked different when we played and there were alot less options ... this is essentially what we all knew and loved as a bat.  It was the first, and for a long time ONLY alternative to wood. These are referred to now as "alloy".  Some alloy bats are 1 piece bats.  However, there are bats with composite handles and alloy barrels.  Little League is not concerned with the material in the handle when referring to alloy bats.  It's the material the barrel is made of that is at issue.

Composite - In the last few years, composite bats have become increasingly popular.  Things don't become popular for no reason.  These bats perform very well.  The barrel of these bats are made of a composite material.  You may have noticed that these bats make a different sound when the ball is struck.  There are different variations of composite bats.  Some are one piece.  Some are obviously two piece with relatively obvious seams.  What has been discovered about these bats is that, once they are broken in and the barrel is "softened up" they perform better than when new.

A little history lesson (sort of):

In 2009 Little League International implemented a rule that all bats used in Little League and below must have a BPF 1.15 clearly imprinted on the bat.  BPF stands for "Bat Performance Factor" and it's a meaningless term to you and I but a meaningful term in a lab setting.  Essentially, what this meant was the Little League would not allow a bat to be used in it's organization that had a Bat Performance Factor greater than 1.15.

In September 2010 Little League notified all leagues that they had information that some composite bats, when broken in, perform greater than the specified BPF of 1.15.  Little League placed a moritorium on the use of composite bats in the Junior, Senior and Big league Divisions.  In this anouncement, they warned us that they had contracted with U. Mass. to test the 2 1/4" barrel bats used in the Major Division and below to see if the performance of these bats was greater BPF 1.15.

In December, Little League sent leagues notification that they were extending the moritorium on the use of composite bats to ALL divisions of Little League.  Meaning, any bat with a composite barrel was no longer allowed in Little League play.

Little League gave bat manufacturers the option of having individual bats tested at a independent laboratory to prove that they complied with the BPF 1.15 standard even after broken in.  To break these bats in the labs had developed a system called "ABI" or "accelerated break In".  This is where they would roll the bats to break them in completely and then test the BPF to see if it exceeded the 1.15 standard.  If the lab results proved that individual bats did in fact comply with the BPF 1.15 standard once broken in, Little League would grant a waiver for the use of the bat in Little League play.

Since then, several composite barrel bats have been granted waivers for use in Little League play.  An up to date list of bats that can be used in the Major Division and below can be found HERE.  

In November of 2011, Little League announced changes to the 2012 rules regarding bats.  Essentially, no changes were made from the 2011 rules for the Major Division and below.  Little League did adopt the High School and collegiate rules for composite barrel bats in the Junior Division and ALL bats for the Senior Division and above.  This requires all composite barrel bats to meet the BBCOR certification requirements in the Junior Division and ALL non-wood bats in the Senior Division to meet the BBCOR requirements. 




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