ERIN MILLS EAGLES GIRLS U16: Info and Rules

MANAGING REFEREES
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We all know how to manage referees right? NOT!!!!!!

As fans, we all expect the ref to be perfect, seemingly fair and listening to every word of help coming from the stands and the players' bench.

The realities of our soccer officials are:

We do not get the "cream" officials usually (only sometimes) at this age level. The better, more seasoned officials are used in the tougher, older games.
Good referees who can gain instant control, maintain a sense of humour, and their composure require years of experience.

We are all collectively helping to develop the game of soccer in Canada. This includes the development of referees (no ref - no game).
Referee development includes allowance for error (tolerance) and a thank you for their effort (yes they get paid, but it is not worth some of the conditions that some less tolerant fans provide). Referees want to have fun doing their job just like the players do. Good referees who do not have satisfaction in their role quit.

Having said that, just like doctors, plumbers, dentists (and coaches), there are good ones, better ones and just plain bad ones. Referees that is.

There are referees out their with waistlines that put mine to shame and make me wonder how they managed to pass the fitness test (and there is one).

There is a shortage of referees everywhere and that simple fact makes it difficult to want to discipline or even identify "bad" referees.

The Ontario Soccer Association, as well as our local Referee association is establishing a communication channel to formally complain about poor officiating.

Babble babble....

Referees do not change their decisions. Don't try and make them.

Referees have been known to create some "balance" in their calls when they know within themselves an error was made and they think the other team "deserves" it.

Referees allow minor fouls to proceed if the fouled team still has the ball.
This is called "the advantage rule".

A hand ball is a hand ball only when the referee says it is. Everyone tries to define it but that is a waste of time.

Referees that are constantly berated by coaches or parents will exercise their substantial power and eject the offending individual(s) from the field or default the game to the other team if you or I fail to comply.

As the coach of your player I am also blessed with responsibility for parental behaviour on the field. You get ejected - I get a hearing and a likely fine. Guess who will pay.

Referees who are constantly hassled, will likely start leaning the game, consciously or unconsciously, to the "other" team. Try and prove it......

I've been around enough to know that local referees "lean" to local teams.

There is one way, and one way only to beat a "bad" ref. That is to put more goals in than the other team.

Referees have omnipotent power on the field.

They determine, on a personal basis, what is "safe".

This applies to player equipment, field conditions, nets and field markings, how close you can stand to the field, to name a few.

One ref may allow player spectacles, another may not. One may expect a mouthguard over braces, another may not. One may allow a player to play in a cast or a joint brace, another may not. One may allow hair clips, another may not.

Yes this smacks of inconsistency and challenges the whole spirit of fairness.

As I tell the girls often, life is not always fair - get used to it.

As long as we are all prepared for strange rulings the emotions with stay in control and we will not embarrass each other.

Embarrass the ref? - watch out! The team loses out in a fruitless attempt to protect an ego.

You will find league game refs far less tolerant than tournament refs.



FIFA - THE RULERS OF THE GAME
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asktheref
ASK THE REF
A great site to have the rules of soccer revealed.

ONTARIO INDOOR SOCCER RULES OF PLAY
Handout: ONTARIO INDOOR SOCCER RULES OF PLAY

OUTDOOR SOCCER RULES FOR COACHES
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An informative site with real-life interpretation fo FIFA's rules of the game.

JUGGLING IS AN IMPORTANT SKILL FOR PLAYERS OF ALL AGES
A number of you have asked me about ball control. One of the best things I learned as a kid was to love the ball and play with it as much as possible. My first coach told me I had to juggle the ball 100 times to make the team! 100 times? I thought, there's no way. And without my hands?! But, I made the commitment of time and effort, and juggling became my foundation in soccer. Using all parts of my body (minus my arms and hands of course!), I learned first to juggle 10 times.
Then to 25. Then to 50. Then to 75. And eventually, I hit 100 after lots of practice
in the front yard and living room.
I recommend juggling to any player, no matter what age. Juggling, combined with ball work of any sort (shooting against the garage - don't tell your parents that came from me!, dribbling around cones, volleying with a partner, whatever, as long as you are using the ball!) creates confidence. Confidence with the ball at your feet.

by Julie Foudy

For more from Julie click on "Tips and Drills" at the bottom of our web page.


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CLUB FIELDS MAP

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