CA District 33 Little League: Welcome


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Our District is located in San Diego California and is comprised of 15 leagues. Our area covers parts of San Diego and La Mesa from Balboa Park to Mount Helix from Highway 94 to Highway 52. Please take a look at our League Boundaries Map for further details.

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Helping young people develop character, discipline and teamwork while maintaining physical
and emotional well being through Little League Baseball.

 

                                                                                                    District Calendar


Little League® To Adopt New USA Baseball Bat Standard Starting in 2018

 Little League Baseball International has announced new baseball bat standards, which will go into effect on January 1st 2018. The link provided below will take you to littleleague.org website to review the announcement. Additionally, on the page provided there is a link to USA Baseball, which provides additional details and the rationale for the change.

Anyone looking to purchase a new baseball bat for use in Little League should review this information prior to making the purchase. Bats currently in use will not be eligible for use beginning on January 1, 2018.

Click on this link to access the details:
 http://www.littleleague.org/media/llnewsarchive/2015/May-August/Little-League-USA-Baseball-Bat-Standard-2018.htm


Mark Beall
Umpire Consultant – California District 33




2017 Western Region Clinic Schedule

Chief Umpire Clinic (Train the Trainer): (December 9-11, 2016) This two part clinic is open to all members of local leagues and Districts (not only UICs) and is designed to provide information and tools on how to train your volunteers to train any level of Little League umpire. The clinic also includes a full day dedicated to the Recruiting, Retaining and Rewarding of your volunteer umpires at the local and District level. Course includes training materials, dormitory style housing and all meals. The clinic begins promptly on Friday at 7pm after a 6pm dinner provided by the Region. No umpire gear needed for this clinic. Cost $85.00 per person.

Registration Link - UIC Training

Rules Instruction Clinics: (Rules Session I: January 20-22, 2017) (Rules Session II: January 28-29, 2017) Rules Clinic Session I: A comprehensive Power Point presentation open to anyone who desires more knowledge of Little League Rules and Regulations. Managers, Coaches, Umpires, Local League Officials and District Officials are encouraged to attend. Friday evening and part of Saturday (if necessary) will focus reviewing regulations. The followin days will focus on Rules for both Baseball and Softball. Course includes training materials, dormitory style housing and all meals. No gear necessary. The clinic will begin promptly at 7:oo pm after a 6:00 pm dinner provided by the region. The course will end at approximately 2:00 pm on Sunday. No umpire gear needed for this clinic. Cost $70.00 per person.

Registration Link - Rules Clinic Session I - Basic Rules and Regulations

Rules Clinic Session II: A combination of Power Point Presentation and real game scenarios for the slightly more advanced Little League volunteer umpire. Saturday will be spent on comprehensive rules review for both baseball and softball. Sunday will be an interactive discussion about real game situations. Course includes training materials, dormitory style housing and all meals. The clinic begins promptly on Saturday at 8:00 am after a 7:00 am breakfast provided by the region. The course will end at approximately 2:00 pm on Sunday. No umpire gear needed for this clinic. Cost $70.00 per person.

Registration Link - Rules Clinic Session II - Advanced

Umpire Mechanics Clinic: (January 27-29, 2017) This clinic will emphasize the on field experience and umpiring philosophy for local league as well as District umpires. Base and plate mechanics will be taught with an eye towards attendees learning new skills, removing some of the rust as the season approaches and bringing training information back to the leagues and Districts. This clinic begins promptly at 7pm on Friday after a 6pm dinner provided by the Region. The course will end at approximately 3:00 pm on Sunday. Umpire Gear is required. Cost $85.00 per person

Registration Link - Mechanics Clinic

Scorekeeper Workshop: (February 4, 2017) A one day training session for anyone interested in the tools and information necessary to keep score at any Little League level for baseball or softball. The clinic begins at 10:00 am on Saturday and ends at approximately 2:00 pm. Cost $15.00 per person.

Registration Link - Scorekeepers

Weeklong Umpire Academy (February 11-17, 2017) This academy is designed for the volunteer Little League Umpire. It is a week of classroom and on the field training that delves into rule knowledge, mechanics, umpiring philosophy and game management. Includes training materials, dormitory style housing and all meals. Umpire gear is required (a very limited supply of equipment to borrow is available). Students are strongly urged to dress as an umpire during all sessions. This Academy begins promptly on Saturday at 7pm after a 6pm dinner provided by the Region. Dorm assignments for students will begin at 5:00pm. Umpire gear is required for this academy. Cost $375.00 per person.

*Due to the popularity of our Weeklong Adult Umpire Academy it is already full. If you would like to be placed on a waiting list please email Cheryl Robinson at westregion@littleleague.org. Please include your name, daytime telephone number and the league or district you volunteer with.

Registration Link - Weeklong Adult Academy School, Weeklong Adult Umpire Academy Canadian Registration




2016 & 2017 Rule Updates & Clarifications

Throughout the winter of 2016, Little League® International held meetings with District Administrators, Assistant District Administrators, and other volunteers at each of our nine regions throughout the world. At each of these meetings, updates and changes to Little League Rules and Regulations were discussed, and at the conclusion of the meetings, these potential new rule and regulations were amended to reflect the direct input from the attendees at these meetings.

The amended agenda was then distributed to District Administrators to vote on whether or not Little League should adopt these new rules and regulations. In total, 463 District Administrators voted on these items, which were then discussed, along with implementation strategies, at the annual spring meeting of the Little League International Board of Directors.  

ITEMS TO BE IMPLEMENTED IMMEDIATELY FOR THE 2016 SEASON:

Item 2: Regulation I(b) and Tournament Manager and Coaches
All Divisions of Baseball and Softball:

Summary:
Beginning with the 2016 tournament season, League Presidents may be eligible to be selected by local league Board of Directors as tournament team manager or coach with written approval from their respective District Administrator. In the event that a District Administrator does not approve the selection, the League President may request the District Administrator determination be reviewed by the Little League International Charter/Tournament Committee through the appropriate Regional Office.
Read the full version and voting results of the amended Regulation 1(b) and Tournament Manager and Coaches

Item 3: Regulation VI(c), Playing Rule 3.03, and Tournament Rule 10 (Softball)
Softball Junior, Senior, and Big League:

Summary:
This allows players within the Junior, Senior, and Big League Softball divisions to be replaced on the pitcher's plate and return to pitch, even if removed from the game, providing they meet the substitution, charged conference, and mandatory play rule(s).
Read the full version and voting results of the amended Regulation VI(c), Playing Rule 3.03, and Tournament Rule 10

Items 7 and 9: Tournament Release of Names and Tournament Team Practice
All Divisions of Baseball and Softball:

Summary:
This change allows leagues to release their tournament teams and begin holding tryouts or practices by tournament teams starting on June 1. Teams shall not be released until the availability and eligibility of all prospective team members has been established. Previously, leagues could announce their teams on June 15 or two weeks prior to the start of their tournament. The Little League group accident insurance underwritten by an AIG member company for tournament teams will not go into effect until June 1. In the event that a tournament would start prior to June 14, a league must obtain a waiver from the Little League International Charter/Tournament Committee to announce its tournament team and begin to hold tryouts or practice prior to the new date of June 1.
All leagues are strongly encouraged to continue to provide regular season and special game opportunities for their players after June 1.
Read the full version and voting results of the amended Tournament Release of Names
Read the full version and voting results of the amended Tournament Team Practice

Item 8: Tournament Player Eligibility
Baseball and Softball 9/10-, 10/11-, 11/12-Year-Old Divisions:
Summary:
This change expands the tournament opportunities, making these three tournaments open to a three-year range of players, and provides leagues additional flexibility in their player selection. The new age structure will create the 8/9/10-Year-Old Division; 9/10/11-Year-Old Division; and 10/11/12-Year-Old Division.
Read the full version and voting results of the amended Tournament Player Eligibility 

ITEMS TO BE IMPLEMENTED FOR THE 2017 SEASON

Item 1: Regulation 1(a) and IV(c)
Baseball and Softball Major, Intermediate (50/70), Junior, Senior, and Big League:
Summary:

This change provides participants at these levels of play the ability to participate in two divisions, provided they qualify under age requirements, Residency/School Attendance Eligibility Requirements, programs, and divisions of play. A player may only be selected to one Tournament team, and must meet tournament eligibility requirements for that specific division. 
Read the full version and voting results of the amended Regulation 1(a) and IV(c) 

If you would like to read the entire article from Little League International, please click on the following link; http://www.littleleague.org/learn/rules/updates-2016-2017-regular-tournament-play.htm?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=rule%20changes%20link&utm_campaign=Little%20Leaguer




Update to the Implementation of Little League Baseball® Age Determination Date

Little League Baseball® to Begin Utilization of August 31 Age Determination Date for the 2018 Season; Children Born Between May 1 and August 31, 2005 to be Grandfathered as 12-Year-Olds For 2018 Season

Over the past couple of years, there has been a lot of discussion about the Little League Baseball® Age Determination Date. This is an important topic to everyone involved in Little League, and Little League has sought input from volunteers, parents, and coaches that has helped guide District Administrators and the Little League International Board of Directors to ultimately change the Age Determination Date for all divisions of Little League Baseball and the Little League Challenger Division® to August 31.

Update:
At the fall 2015 meeting of the Little League International Board of Directors, it was approved to grandfather the four months of children born between May 1 and August 31, 2005, for the 2018 season, so that no child will lose their 12-year-old season of Little League Baseball.

Why the change?
In 2011, Little League conducted very detailed participation research. As a result of that research, we learned that parents, players, and volunteers wanted to see Little League become, as a whole, a younger program, and give children an easier way to play Little League with their classmates. Since the research concluded, Little League revamped its Tee Ball program, established a Coach Pitch Program, and changed its residency requirements to allow children to play in the league where their school is located. Adjusting the Age Determination Date will help us achieve the goal of making Little League younger. And, making the date August 31, the same that many schools in many states use for student registration, allows Little Leaguers to play with their classmates.

This change will make the Little League Baseball Division, also known as the Major Division, truly a 12 and under program – ensuring that no child playing in the Little League/Major Division will turn 13 years old at any point during their final season in that division. The same will be true with the upper age limit at all teenage divisions of Little League Baseball.

What’s the difference?
In 2014, Little League District Administrators initially voted to move the age determination date from April 30 to December 31, effective with the 2018 season. That was amended by District Administrators and the Little League International Board of Directors in August 2015, moving the date from December 31 to August 31. Effective November 2015, the implementation plan has been amended, grandfathering the four-months of children born between May 1 and August 31, 2005 as 12-year-olds for the 2018 season.

For players born on or before April 30, 2005:
The new age determination date of August 31 will be effective starting with the 2018 Little League Baseball Season. For the 2016 and 2017 seasons, these players will use the April 30 age determination date.

For players born between May 1, 2005 and August 31, 2005:
The new age determination date of August 31 will be effective starting with the 2019 Little League Baseball Season. For the 2016, 2017, 2018 season, these players will use the April 30 age determination date.

For players born on or after September 1, 2005:
The August 31 age determination date will be effective immediately, starting with the 2016 season. This was the implementation used for the 2015 season, with players turning 4 to 9 years old during the 2015 calendar year to use the December 31 age determination date. That implementation remains in place, except instead of using December 31, you will use August 31.

“Having a meaningful Little League experience is an important milestone for millions of children around the world,” said Stephen D. Keener, Little League President and CEO. “As we continue to work with our volunteers and the International Board of Directors, we believe this solution allows us to accomplish our goal of making the Little League Baseball Division truly a 12 and under program, while ensuring that all children get the opportunity to fully enjoy their 12-year-old year in Little League.”


 

2016 Little League Age Chart
FOR BASEBALL DIVISION ONLY

Match month (top line) and box with year of birth. League age indicated at right.

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC AGE
2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 4
2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010 5
2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 6
2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 7
2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 8
2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2006 2006 2006 2006 9
2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2005 2005 2005 2005 10
        2005 2005 2005 2005         10
2005 2005 2005 2005 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 11
2004 2004 2004 2004 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 12
2003 2003 2003 2003 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 13
2002 2002 2002 2002 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 14
2001 2001 2001 2001 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 15
2000 2000 2000 2000 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 16
1999 1999 1999 1999 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 17
1998 1998 1998 1998 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 1997 18

 

Note: This age chart is for BASEBALL DIVISIONS ONLY, and only for 2016.


2017 Little League Age Chart
FOR BASEBALL DIVISION ONLY

Match month (top line) and box with year of birth. League age indicated at right.

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC AGE
2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012 2012 4
2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 5
2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010 6
2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 7
2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 8
2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 9
2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2006 2006 2006 2006 10
2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2005 2005 2005 2005 11
        2005 2005 2005 2005         11
2005 2005 2005 2005 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 12
2004 2004 2004 2004 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 13
2003 2003 2003 2003 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 14
2002 2002 2002 2002 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 15
2001 2001 2001 2001 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 16
2000 2000 2000 2000 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 1999 17
1999 1999 1999 1999 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 18

 

Note: This age chart is for BASEBALL DIVISIONS ONLY, and only for 2017.


2018 Little League Age Chart
FOR BASEBALL DIVISION ONLY

Match month (top line) and box with year of birth. League age indicated at right.

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC AGE
2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 4
2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012 2012 5
2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 6
2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010 7
2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 8
2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 9
2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 10
2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2006 2006 2006 2006 11
2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2005 2005 2005 2005 12
        2005 2005 2005 2005         12
2005 2005 2005 2005         2004 2004 2004 2004 13
2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2003 2003 2003 2003 14
2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2002 2002 2002 2002 15
2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2001 2001 2001 2001 16
2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2000 2000 2000 2000 17
2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1999 1999 1999 1999 18

 

Note: This age chart is for BASEBALL DIVISIONS ONLY, and only for 2018.


2019 Little League Age Chart
FOR BASEBALL DIVISION ONLY

Match month (top line) and box with year of birth. League age indicated at right.

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC AGE
2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2014 2014 2014 2014 4
2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 5
2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012 2012 6
2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 7
2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010 8
2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 9
2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 10
2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 11
2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2006 2006 2006 2006 12
2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2005 2005 2005 2005 13
2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2004 2004 2004 2004 14
2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2004 2003 2003 2003 2003 15
2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2003 2002 2002 2002 2002 16
2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2001 2001 2001 2001 17
2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2001 2000 2000 2000 2000 18

 

Note: This age chart is for BASEBALL DIVISIONS ONLY, and only for 2019.




Malik's Medical & Family Support

One of our league's parents is asking for your help. Her name is Heather Thornton and is the UIC for North Park Little League. Heather is going thru any parent's worst nightmare, having to deal with her son's recent diagnoses that he has bone cancer.

Malik is 12 years old and was recently diagnosed with Osteosarcoma.  Osteosarcoma is the most common histological form of primary bone cancer. It is most prevalent in children and young adults. Currently, it is in his leg and they are running test to rule out any spread of the disease. For those of you that don't know Malik, he is a force of nature. Anyone who has ever met him, whether it is through sports or school loves him. He has a wonderful smile and the heart of a giant. Malik has been playing baseball and football since he was born.

This will be the fight of his life. Although Heather is sure that Malik will handle his part, she is asking for help with the rest. Due to horrible twists for fate, Heather is currently unemployed, without a car and living with friends. She would really like to be able to have a home with a bed for him (rather than a couch) where he can heal and rest. This is going to test all of their strength. Her boys are her life and she lives for them. Please take a minute and go to her GoMeFund webpage.... https://www.gofundme.com/7m5swn94. Any donations would be greatly appreciated.   

 



What Makes A Nightmare Sports Parent -- And What Makes A Great One

Hundreds of college athletes were asked to think back: "What is your worst memory from playing youth and high school sports?" Their overwhelming response: "The ride home from games with my parents."

With the new baseball and softball season fast approaching, we would like to share with you the following article published on the website " The Post Game." Take a minute and click on the following link: http://www.thepostgame.com//blog/more-family-fun/201202/what-makes-nightmare-sports-parent and see if what type of Little League parent you are?




Teaching Life's Lessons

Little League On-Line offers monthly newsletters on safety, coaching, umpiring and general little league issues. From time to time we will share articles that we think would be good for everyone in Distict 33 to read. In the March 2012 newsletter "Fair Ball"  is an article written by Bill Carter, Western Region Umpire in Chief, titled "Teaching Lifes Lessons."  Please take a moment and click on the following link to read Bill's article:   http://www.littleleague.org/Page58860.aspx




How to Stop a Bullying Coach

By Patrick Cohn, Ph.D. and Lisa Cohn

Bullying is a growing epidemic in sports. As sports parents, it's critical for you to be prepared to protect your young athletes. If you think this issue won't ever come up in your kids' sports careers, think again. Bully coaches are the number one topic parents write us about at Kids' Sports Psychology.

Have your kids ever had a coach who yelled at, insulted or intimidated them? It's possible they have, but were too embarrassed to tell you. It's important for you to be on the lookout for bully coaches and to take immediate action if you suspect your young athletes are being bullied.

Bully coaches target all kinds of young athletes. They can set their sights on kids who are overweight, small, or who lack confidence, for instance. These coaches also target gifted athletes because they believe their approach will "toughen up" their athletes.

It's important to keep in mind that most volunteer coaches are not trained. Many of them use teaching techniques that their coaches used with them. Some of them don't understand they're acting like bullies. Many coaches will change their behavior if you approach them in an appropriate manner. We've received letters of confession from coaches who say that once they understood how much their words and actions hurt their athletes, they changed their style. More: 6 Tips for Coaching Your Own Child

Whether a coach's bullying is intentional or unintentional, your job as sports parents is the same. If your athletes are teased, excluded or otherwise treated badly by coaches, you need to take steps to help keep their confidence intact, stay focused under adversity, and remain in sports.

The bottom line, for you as parents: Be on the lookout for bully coaches and arm yourself with the information you need to take action.


Stories From the Trenches
The many sports parents who have written us about bullying say their young athletes are teased, harassed, intimidated and threatened by bully coaches. Here's what some sports parents tell us:

"My daughter was bullied relentlessly on her high school gymnastics team by her coach. She was screamed at in front of her entire team after every meet, called names, criticized for everything, including how she talked, how she looked, what she wore. She was hanged in effigy." - Sports Parent

"Our teenage son's football experience has soured because of coaches who do not want their players to have any fun. One practice his coach told him to get in line for a drill and he told the coach his shoulder and arm hurt too much. The coach told him to quit whining over aches and get in line. When my son refused, from that day on their relationship has been bad. Eventually we took him to doctors and he missed the rest of the season." ~ Sports Parent.  For more stories from parents visit the Youth Sports Psychology blog


How Bully Coaches Affect Kid's Experience
Youth coaches are critical to kids' sports experiences. They can influence whether young athletes enjoy sports and want to continue to play. Some coaches get kids fired up about playing sports, while other coaches may discourage kids or take the fun out of sports. A good coach can keep kids' interest in sports alive.

Bullied kids think there is something wrong with them. This deflates them and creates a lack of comfort and security in sports. Often, young athletes' first reaction to being treated this way is shame. They don't want to talk about their experience. They feel as if they somehow caused the coaches to treat them badly.

What's more, bullying can hurt an athlete's confidence—in and out of sports. Sometimes kids say they can't get a bully's negative words out of their heads.

Kids who are bullied experience difficulty focusing on what they should focus on. They sometimes obsess about what a coach might say or do if they make mistakes or do something wrong. The kids are in fear. They focus on the wrong things during sports because they are preoccupied with gaining approval from the coach (or not disappointing the coach). Often they are afraid of how the coach will react if they make a bad move or decision.


Behaviors of Bully Coaches
Bully coaches often yell at, tease, humiliate and intimidate kids. Parents should never underestimate the importance of this type of behavior. It can really hurt kids' self-esteem.

As sports parents it's your job to ensure your athletes are in good hands. Bully coaches do NOT toughen up your young athletes, as they might insist. They don't improve kids' performance, either.

Coaches who bully—either with harsh words or physical harm—can hurt young athletes' self-esteem, undermine their social skills and make it hard for them to trust. In some cases, these coaches can make kids feel anxious and depressed.  More: 3 Sports Psychology Tips for Parents and Coaches

What's more, coaches who use such negative feedback are generally focused too much on one thing: winning or turning out elite athletes. They give kids the message that winning is everything. That makes kids focus too much on outcomes—such as the score or win. It can prevent them from reaping the social and emotional benefits of taking part in sports.

Focusing too much on the score or winning also can hurt kids' performance. They often develop fear of failure. That means they stop taking risks and they play too tentatively. That's because they're afraid the coach will yell at them or punish them.


Take Action
Before you even sign your kids up for a team, it's entirely appropriate and reasonable to interview the coach. You should ask potential coaches about their philosophy and how they handle playing time.  More: Why Coaches Should Have a Parents Meeting

If your young athletes are already part of a team, but don't seem happy with the coach, you need to do some research. Gently ask your kids questions about how the coaches treat the team and watch carefully for how they react.

You might ask other parents what they've seen or heard. Attend games and practices and keep a lookout for signs of yelling, intimidation or physical bullying. Some coaches, for example, will throw balls at kids in an effort to scare them. This shouldn't be tolerated

If you see or hear about a coach who yells at, intimidates or insults kids, you should take action. If you merely sit back and complain, you're part of the problem. Instead, you need to begin by talking to the coach. You can gently suggest that his or her behavior may hurt kids' confidence or self-esteem.

In some cases, you may find that you can't change the coach's behavior. If this happens, you should try talking to a league or school administrator who oversees the coach. If that isn't helpful, consider moving your child to a different coach or team. Staying with the same coach will likely increase your kids' anxiety and hurt their athletic performance and confidence—at a minimum.  More: How to Keep a Strong Parent-Coach Relationship

Award-winning parenting writer Lisa Cohn and Youth Sports Psychology expert Dr. Patrick Cohn are co-founders of The Ultimate Sports Parent. Pick up their free e-book, "Ten Tips to Improve Confidence and Success in Young Athletes" by visiting youthsportspsychology.com.





District 33 Calendar

Take a look a our District Calendar for the lastest news on upcoming events hosted by District 33 and our local leagues. Just click on the header for a more information on each event. Be sure to add our Google Calendar to yours and you'll receive notifications of each of the events below.

 




2016 District 33 Staff Photos



Clay Berry
District Administrator  


Dan Esqueda
 Assistant District
Administrator 


Pete Gregorovic
Assistant District
Administrator & Player Agent 


Shannon Thomas
Assistant District Administrator & 
Player Agent 


Mark Beall
Umpire Consultant
  


Sami Kern
Treasurer


Carol Hill
Secretary &
Coaching Clinic
Coordinator


Steve Taylor
Safety Officer


Josie Thomas
Junior/Senior Rep

  Olivier Wardenaar
Softball Rep 


Bill Owens
Safety Assistants


Bob Diosdado
Information Officer 
 


Angela Engquist
Events 


David Graham
Schedules

  Kendra Swhartz
Score Keeper


Danyell DiLena
Coach Coordinator
  


Kristal Gordon
Assistant Player Agent  

 

 

 




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