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Holts Summit Local Weather
Diamond Wildcats
Darrell Hiatte
Holts Summit, Missouri
65043
 
  College  
 

Information for Student Athletes

NCAA Division I 

Academic-Eligibility Requirements

If you want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics

scholarship during your first year, you must:

Graduate from high school;

Complete these 16 core courses:

- 4 years of English

- 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)

- 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school)

- 1 extra year of English, math, or natural or physical science

- 2 years of social science

- 4 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy);

Earn a minimum required grade-point average in your core courses; and

Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core-course grade-point average and test score sliding scale (for example, a 2.400 core-course grade-point average needs an 860 SAT).

Requirement to graduate with your high school class. You must complete the 16 core-course requirement in eight semesters, which begins when you initially started high school with your ninth-grade class. If you graduate from high school in eight semesters with your class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) to meet NCAA Division I eligibility requirements.  You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course.

Division I Qualifier

Being a qualifier entitles you to:

Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college;

Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and

Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

NCAA Division II 

2009 - July 31, 2013

If you enroll in a Division II college and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must:

Graduate from high school;

Complete these 14 core courses:

- 3 years of English

- 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)

- 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school)

- 2 additional years of English, math, or natural or physical science

- 2 years of social science

- 3 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy);

Earn a 2.000 grade-point average or better in your core courses; and

Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.

August 1, 2013, and After

If you enroll in a Division II college on or after August 1, 2013, and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must:

Graduate from high school;

Complete these 16 core courses:

- 3 years of English

- 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)

- 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school)

-
3 additional years of English, math, or natural or physical science

- 2 years of social science

- 4 years of additional core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy);

Earn a 2.000 grade-point average or better in your core courses; and

Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.

Division II Qualifier

Being a qualifier entitles you to:

Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college;

Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and

Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

Division II Partial Qualifier

You will be considered a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the academic requirements listed above, but you have graduated from high school and meet one of the following:

The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68; or

Completion of the 14 core courses with a 2.000 core-course grade-point average.

As a partial qualifier, you:

Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first year of college;

Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college;

Cannot compete during your first year of college; and

Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

Division II Nonqualifier

You will be considered a nonqualifier if you did not graduate from high school, or, if you graduated and are missing both the core-course grade-point average or minimum number of core courses and the required ACT or SAT scores.

As a nonqualifier, you:

Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college;

Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid; and

Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

 



Tuesday, February 5
Questions to Ask as You Consider Colleges

You may want to ask your prospective college coaches the following questions as you consider colleges.

Athletics

1. What positions will I play on your team? It is not always obvious. Most coaches want to be flexible, so you might not receive a definite answer.

2. What other players may be competing at the sameposition? The response could give you an idea of when you can expect to be a starter.

3. Will I be redshirted my first year? The school's policy on redshirting may impact you both athletically and academically.

4. What expectations do you have for training andconditioning? This will reveal the institution's commitment to a training and conditioning program. 5. How would you best describe your coaching style? Every coach has a particular style that involves different motivational techniques and discipline. You need to know if a coach's teaching style matches your learning style.

6. When does the head coach's contract end? How long doesthe coach intend to stay? The answer could be helpful. Do not make any assumptions about how long a coach will be at a school. If the coach leaves, does this change your mind about the school/program?

7. What are preferred, invited and uninvited walk-on situations? How many do you expect to compete? How many earn a scholarship? Situations vary from school to school.8. Who else are you recruiting for my position? Coaches may consider other student-athletes for every position.

9. Is medical insurance required for my participation? Is itprovided by the college? You may be required to provide proof of insurance.

10.
If I am seriously injured while competing, who isresponsible for my medical expenses? Different colleges have different policies.

11. What happens if I want to transfer to another school? You may not transfer without the permission of your current school's athletics administration. Ask how often coaches grant this privilege and ask for an example of a situation in which permission was not granted.

12.
What other factors should I consider when choosinga college? Be realistic about your athletics ability and the type of athletics experience you would enjoy. Some student-athletes want to be part of a particular athletics program, even if that means little or no playing time. Other considerations include coaching staff and style. Of course, the ideal is to choose a college or university that will provide you with both the educational and athletics opportunities you want.

Academics

1. How good is the department in my major? How many students are in the department? What credentials do faculty members hold? What are graduates of the program doing after school?

2. What percentage of players on scholarship graduate? The response will suggest the school's commitment to academics. You might want to ask two follow-up questions: a. What percentage of incoming students eventually graduate? b. What is the current team's grade-point average?

3. What academic support programs are available tostudent-athletes? Look for a college that will help you become a better student. 4. If I have a diagnosed and documented disability, whatkind of academic services are available? Special academic services may help you achieve your academic goals.

5. How many credit hours should I take in season and out ofseason? It is important to determine how many credit hours are required for your degree and what pace you will follow to obtain that degree.

6. Are there restrictions in scheduling classes aroundpractice? NCAA rules prevent you from missing class for practice.

7. Is summer school available? If I need to take summerschool, will it be paid for by the college? You may need to take summer school to meet academic and/or graduation requirements.

College Life

1. What is a typical day for a student-athlete? The answer will give you a good idea of how much time is spent in class, practice, study and travel. It also will give you a good indication of what coaches expect.

2. What are the residence halls like? The response should give you a hint of how comfortable you would be in your room, study areas, community bathrooms and at the laundry facilities. Also ask about the number of students in a room, co-ed dorms and the rules governing life in the residence halls.

3. Must student-athletes live on campus? If “yes,” ask about exceptions.

Financial Aid

1. How much financial aid is available for both the academic year and summer school? What does your scholarship cover?

2. How long does my scholarship last? Most people think a “full ride” is good for four years, but athletics financial aid is available on a one-year, renewable basis.

3. What are my opportunities for employment while I am astudent? Find out if you can be employed in season, out of season or during vacation periods.

4. Exactly how much will the athletics scholarship be? Whatwill and will not be covered? It is important to understand what college expenses your family is responsible for so you can arrange to pay those. Educational expenses can be paid with student loans and government grants, but it takes time to apply for them. Find out early so you can get something lined up.

5. Am I eligible for additional financial aid? Are there anyrestrictions? Sometimes a student-athlete cannot accept a certain type of scholarship because of NCAA limitations. If you will be receiving other scholarships, let the coach and financial aid officer know so they can determine if you may accept additional dollars.

6. Who is financially responsible if I am injured whilecompeting? You need to understand your financial obligations if you suffer an injury while participating in athletics.

7. Under what circumstances would my scholarship bereduced or canceled? Coaches should be able to give you some idea of how players are evaluated from year to year and how these decisions are made. The institution may have a policy governing renewal of athletics aid. Ask if such a policy exists and read it.

8. Are there academic criteria tied to maintaining thescholarship? Some institutions add academic requirements to scholarships (e.g., minimum grade-point average).

9. What scholarship money is available after eligibilityis exhausted to help me complete my degree? It may take longer than four years to complete a college degree program. Some colleges assist student-athletes financially as they complete their degrees. Ask how such aid is awarded. You may have to work with the team or in the athletics department to qualify for this aid.

10. What scholarship money is available if I suffer an athleticscareer-ending injury? Not every institution continues to provide an athletics scholarship to a student-athlete who can no longer compete because of a career-ending injury.

11. Will my scholarship be maintained if there is a change incoaches? A coach may not be able to answer this, but the athletics director may.

Eligibility Center Registration:Transcript and Test-Score Submissions

It is best for your son or daughter to register with the eligibility center at the beginning of his or her junior year. Once registered, your son or daughter must ask the high school counselor or registrar to send his or her academic transcripts to the eligibility center. ACT or SAT score(s) also must be submitted to the eligibility center. Your son or daughter must list the eligibility center as a separate recipient of his or her ACT or SAT scores when he or she takes the test. The test scores must come directly from SAT or ACT. The eligibility center will not accept test scores reported on the high school transcript.

The eligibility center will typically review your son's or daughter's high school record and send a preliminary report to him or her, with notification of any missing requirements. A final report may be issued once your son's or daughter's high school submits a final transcript showing high school graduation. Please call the eligibility center at 877/262-1492 if you have any questions.

How to Monitor Your Son's or Daughter's Eligibility

You may check the eligibility center Web site at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net to make sure your son or daughter is taking approved courses. A list of core courses should have been submitted to the eligibility center by your son's or daughter's high school. Check your son's or daughter's schedule before each year in high school to make certain that he or she is taking the required courses.

NCAA colleges may obtain information from the eligibility center about your son's or daughter's status and progress only if his or her information is specifically requested by that college.

Financial Aid

If your son or daughter is academically eligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics and is accepted as a full-time student at a Division I or II school, he or she may receive athletics-based financial aid from the school. Division I or II financial aid may include tuition and fees, room and board, and books.

 



SAT Information
 

ACT Information

 ACT and SAT Tests

Test-Score Requirements

You must achieve the required score on the SAT or ACT before your full-time collegiate enrollment. You must do this whether you are a citizen of the United States or of a foreign country. Also, stateadministered ACT exams will be accepted by the Eligibility Center.  You may take the national test given on one or more of the dates shown below.

IMPORTANT CHANGE:

All SAT and ACT scores must be reported to the Eligibility Center directly from the testing agency. Test scores will not be accepted if reported on a high school transcript.  When registering for the SAT or ACT, input the Eligibility Center code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported directly to the Eligibility Center. SAT Test Dates

October 10, 2009

November 7, 2009

December 5, 2009

January 23, 2010

March 13, 2010

May 1, 2010

June 5, 2010

ACT Test Dates

September 12, 2009

October 24, 2009

December 12, 2009

February 6, 2010

April 10, 2010

June 12, 2010

Taking Tests More than Once

You may take the SAT or the ACT more than one time. If you take either test more than once, you may use your best subscore from different tests to meet the minimum test-score requirements.

Here is an example:

Math Verbal/Critical Reading Total Score

SAT (10/09) 350
470 820 SAT (12/09) 420 440 860

Scores used 420 470 890

Your test score will continue to be calculated using the math and verbal/critical reading subsections of the SAT and the math, science, English and reading subsections of the ACT. The writing component of the ACT or SAT will not be used to determine your qualifier status.

 



Tuesday, February 5
NCAA - Initial Eligibility Why an Eligibility Center

Initial Eligibility Why an Eligibility Center? NCAA colleges and institutions agree that it is important for all high school students to meet minimum academic standards to practice or compete in college athletics. The eligibility center evaluates student courses, grades and test scores to determine whether students meet NCAA minimum academic requirements. The NCAA membership is committed to academic success and graduation of its student athletes. NCAA Initial Eligibility and College Admission are Both Needed Admission to an NCAA college or university is not the same as NCAA initial eligibility.  Each institution decides which students to admit, based on its admissions criteria. Keep in mind that if a student-athlete meets NCAA initial-eligibility standards, that student still may not be admitted to the institution. Likewise, a student-athlete who gains admission to a college or university may not meet NCAA initial eligibility standards. Help Students Select Courses Grades Eight–12 If students take a rigorous college-preparatory curriculum, they are more likely to be successful. Students should select courses that:

 



Tuesday, February 5
NCAA - Recruiting Terms

Introduction, College coaches must follow the rules outlined in this section. You are expected to follow these rules as well. 

Recruiting Terms Contact. A contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with you or your parents off the college's campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with you or your parents at your high school or any location where you are competing or practicing. 

Contact period. During this time, a college coach may have in person contact with you and/or your parents on or off the college's campus. The coach may also watch you play or visit your high school. You and your parents may visit a college campus and the coach may write and telephone you during this period. 

Dead period. The college coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents at any time in the dead period.  The coach may write and telephone you or your parents during this time. 

Evaluation. An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate your academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting your high school or watching you practice or compete. 

Evaluation period. The college coach may watch you play or visit your high school, but cannot have any in-person conversations with you or your parents off the college's campus. You and your parents can visit a college campus during this period. A coach may write and telephone you or your parents during this time. 

Official visit. Any visit to a college campus by you and your parents paid for by the college. The college may pay the following expenses:

Your transportation to and from the college;

Room and meals (three per day) while you are visiting the college; and

Reasonable entertainment expenses, including three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest.  Before a college may invite you on an official visit, you will have to provide the college with a copy of your high school transcript (Division I only) and SAT, ACT or PLAN score and register with the NCAA Eligibility Center. 

Prospective student-athlete. You become a “prospective student-athlete” when:

You start ninth-grade classes; or

Before your ninth-grade year, a college gives you, your relatives or your friends any financial aid or other benefits that the college does not provide to students generally. 

Quiet period. The college coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents off the college's campus. The coach may not watch you play or visit your high school during this period. You and your parents may visit a college campus during this time. A coach may write or telephone you or your parents during this time. 

Unofficial visit. Any visit by you and your parents to a college campus paid for by you or your parents. The only expense you may receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. You may make as many unofficial visits as you like and may take those visits at any time. The only time you cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a dead period.  

Verbal commitment. This phrase is used to describe a prospect's commitment to a school before he or she signs (or is able to sign) a National Letter of Intent. A prospect can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become very popular for both prospects and coaches, this "commitment" is NOT binding on either the prospect or the school. Only the signing of the National Letter of Intent accompanied by a financial aidagreement is binding on both parties. 

Recruiting Calendars To look at recruiting calendars for all sports, go to NCAA.org. 

NCAA Eligibility Center, Starting November 1, 2007, the NCAA Eligibility Center will begin processing academic and amateurism certifications and taking over all operations previously handled by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse. Located in Indianapolis, Indiana, the eligibility center works closely with the NCAA national office,ensuring all academic and amateurism regulations are met. You may continue to access your initial-eligibility file by visiting www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. Customer service representatives are available to assist you. Please use the telephone numbers listed below (current clearinghouse information) to reach customer service representatives. Any additional information, including transcripts and test scores should be sent to:  

After November 1, 2007:

NCAA Eligibility Center

P.O. Box 7110

Indianapolis, Indiana 46206

www.ncaaclearinghouse.net

877/262-1492 (customer service Monday – Friday,8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Eastern time)

317/223-0700 (international 

 



Thursday, August 13
Planning, NCAA - What to do and When

Freshmen and Sophomores

Start planning now!

Work hard to get the best grades possible.

Take classes that match your school’s list of approved core courses.

You can receive your school’s list of approved core courses at www.eligibilitycenter.org.

Juniors

At the beginning of your junior year, register at www.eligibilitycenter.org.

Register to take the ACT, SAT or both and use the Eligibility Center code (9999) as a score recipient.

Double check to make sure the courses you have taken match your school’s list of approved core courses. Ask your guidance counselor to send an official transcript to the Eligibility Center after completing your junior year. If you have attended more than one high school, the Eligibility Center will need official transcripts from all high schools attended. (The Eligibility Center does NOT accept faxed transcripts or test scores.)

Before registration for classes for your senior year, check with your guidance counselor to determine the amount of core courses that you need to complete your senior year.

Seniors

Take the SAT and/or ACT again, if necessary. The Eligibility Center will use the best scores from each section of the ACT or SAT to determine your best cumulative score.

Continue to take college-prep courses.

Check the courses you have taken to match your school’s list of approved core courses.

Review your amateurism responses and request final amateurism certification on or after April 1 (for fall enrollees) or October 1 (for spring enrollees).

Continue to work hard to get the best grades possible.

Graduate on time (in eight academic semesters). If you fall behind, use summer school sessions before graduation to catch up.

After graduation, ask your guidance counselor to send your final transcript to the Eligibility Center with proof of graduation.



   
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